Macro: Leopard Anemone Shrimp アヤトリカクレエビ

Izucaris masudai Okuno, 1999

Leopard Anemone Shrimp and Gorgonian wrapper

Ayatori-kakure-ebi in Japanese

These days, Leopard Anemone Shrimps can be seen easily at Owase. Gorgonian wrapper anemone that the shrimps live has been known from over 20 years here. Though, as far as I know, Leopard Anemone Shrimps has been discovered within three years. Anemonefishes came to able to stay wintering also. Water temp may be coming up here also. Owase, Mie, Japan -20m

Macro: Red-netted Goniobranch

Goniobranchus tinctorius (Rüppell & Leuckart, 1830)

Sarasa-Umiushi

Sarasa-Umiushi in Japanese

Red-netted Goniobranch is called “Sarasa Umiushi”. Umiushi meaning Nudibranch or Sea slug in Japanese. This is a common nudi at Owase. It looks like wearing red lace knitting. It may be named after as that looks.
According to Wikipedia, Sarasa is a dyeing and weaving term that refers to a cotton-colored pattern-dyed product of Indian origin and similar pattern-colored dyed products produced in Asia, Europe, etc. under the influence thereof.
-20m

Macro: Orange coral キサンゴ

Dendrophyllia sp.

laughter in the dark

Kisango in Japanese

This coral like a flower can be seen on the wall of rocks or on pillars of artificial fish reef everywhere at Owase.
This scene remembers the monster flower “Audrey II” that appeared the American rock musical comedy horror film “Little Shop of Horrors” directed by Frank Oz.
As closer and looking at them, may be able to hear that laughter. Owase, Mie, Japan. -20m

Close-up: Basket star テヅルモヅル

Gorgonocephalus

Astrochalcis sp. (micropus?) Thanks, Ron Silver

Abstract beauty in the sea. The head of “Medusa” or CG?

Basket star
Tezuru-Mozuru in Japanese

The scientific name of Basket star is Gorgonocephalus. It comes from “Medusa”.
She is the famous monster of Greek myth who has snake hair.
“gorgós” means “dreaded” and “cephalus” means “head” in Greek.
Although it makes me a stone also, it’s meaning I am happy too much.
It is rare to find this creature.
It looks like a moving fractal image reminiscent of early CG. It fascinates me.
So, I can’t move away in front of that, like a stone.
Owase, Mie, Japan. -20m

Macro: Feather star

Abstract beauty in the sea.Vertigo in the feather, feather, feather

Umi-Shida in Japanses

Spirals, and floods of color attract for me. When looking through a macro lens, the usual feather star transforms into abstract art at once. Owase, Mie, Japan

Close-up : Brown-lined puffer キタマクラ

Canthigaster rivulata (Temminck & Schlegel, 1850)

Pretty but venomous

Kitamakura in Japanese

Brown-lined puffer is tiny pretty fish. It is often swimming around colorful soft coral woods. The Japanese name of this puffer is “KITAMAKUR”. KITA is north. MAKUR is a pillow.
In Japan, when people die, there is a custom of turning the head of the dead body to the north.
It means that you will die if you eat this fish, carelessly.
This fish is venomous like other Family Tetraodontidae.
The body of Brown-lined puffer is flatter than another puffer.
It is similar to an edible fish like the filefish. This sinister name is a warning that you should be careful not to make a mistake.

Macro : Chromodoris orientalis Rudman, 1983 シロウミウシ

Very simple but Beautiful

Chromodoris orientalis is feeding seaweed on a rock.
This nudibranch is commonly found at Owase. It is known as “Shiro-Umiushi=White sea slug” in Japanese common name.
Their fashion is very simple. So white body with black spots and orange-yellow fringe. That’s all.
Don’t you think it looks so stylish?

Close-up : Spot eye flathead ワニゴチ

Inegocia ochiaii Imamura, 2010

They look the same, but they are different. 

Wani-gochi in Japanese

Wow! It is Crocodile Fish (Cymbacephalus beauforti (Knapp, 1973)) ! Is it right? The answer is correct, and incorrect. This is Spot eye flathead (Inegocia ociaii Imamura, 2010). It is called “Wani-Gochi” in Japan. “Wani” means Crocodile. So, it can say “correct”. These two flathead is a very similar shape. Crocodile Fish has lappets on each eyeball. And has eyebrow above each eye. Spot eye flathead has lappets also, however, it doesn’t have eyebrows on each eyeball. Spot eye flathead is found in coastal water more south of Sagami-Bay in the Pacific side, more south of Wakasa-Bay in Sea of ​​Japan side. Crocodile Fish is the fish that is seen more south, like Kyushu or Okinawa. So, the answer is incorrect. Anyway, when I find out a Sopt eye falthead, I’m fun. I can feel tropical even in the Temperate sea.  Kajika, Owase, Mie, Japan. -18m

Macro : Sporochnus radiciformis (R. Brown ex Turner) C. Agardh

ケヤリ

Keyari in Japanses

When Spring has come, we can see the algae which have a head like a small Pom Pom Ball on the end of branches. This algae is popular as the background of a photo of fish. This is Sporochnus radiciformis (R. Brown ex Turner) C. Agardh. It belongs to Class Phaeophyceae, Family Sporochnaceae. It is a distributed Pacific side south from Kanto. It is called “Keyari” in Japanese. At the Edo era (1603-1868), when a lord traveled as a corp, decorated spear, named Keyari, is used as the mark of the corp head, so it is called Keyari as the common name. This algae is distributed in Australia also. Please tell me a common name in English. Kushimoto, Wakayama, Japan.

Irokaeruankou in Japanese

Macro : Shiho’s seahorse ハナタツ

Hippocampus sindonis Jordan & Snyder, 1901

The Maracot Deep

Looking at the seahorse, I always remember a scene from the old science fiction novel “The Maracot Deep (1929)”. This novel is the work of Arthur Conan Doyle, famous for the adventures of Sherlock Holmes. The story is the adventure that marine scientists discover the sunken city Atlantis. I can’t forget is the scene where huge size seahorse eating eyeballs of huge halibut. What’s even scarier, the victim halibut have been sucked its eyeballs by the slender mouth of seahorse. So that I was a child age, it made scare my little heart. The seahorse of the photograph is a small size one called Shiho’s seahorse. This is about only 5 cm, tiny, cute, creature. However, if it would be over 10m….. I think stupid thinking. Lol. Owase, Mie, Japan. -20m

Oriental flying gurnard

Dactyloptena orientalis

Hi, this photo is not the same as I uploaded the previous time.
 The description of the photo is different.
 Thank you, Ron Silver.
 He taught me the correct name as below.
 “Based on geographic location, this is Dactyloptena orientalis (Dactylopterus volitans is an Atlantic/Caribbean species”
  This pic is taken at Owase, Mie, Japan.
 I re-upload the photo that corrects the name on the picture.
 Thank you.

Close-up : Longfin batfish ツバメウオ

Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775)

Shy and friendly

Tsubame-uo in Japanese

Longfin batfish are often seen from late summer to spring at the artificial reef point, called Gyosho point (The top is -18m. The bottom is -23m). They come from anywhere with a couple or three. And will go away to somewhere. At first, they are shy. When they look at divers, they hide behind the reef blocks. However, after a while, you will be able to shoot from nearby. It is a fun scene for them to swim behind divers looking for Longfin batfish. This picture was taken during a “safety stop”. If they feel like it, they will rise up with divers and see off. Owase, Mie, Japan. -5m