Japanese Giant Salamander (Andrias japonicus)

Looks like a Godzilla, but the cute calm freshwater creature

Bo-chan

“Bo-chan” is this salamander’s name. It means Sleepy, Calm, Quiet… Local elementary school students named that from his attitude. He is the mascot of the Nabari Local Museum. From child salamanders that have gills to an adult-like Bo-chan, a lot of salamanders can be seen here.

Japanese giant salamanders are one of the largest Amphibians.
According to Wikipedia, Japanese giant salamanders can grow to be five feet long (160 cm) and 55 pounds (25 kg). The largest wild specimen on record weighed 26.3 kg and was 136 cm long.
Bo-chan is 57cm long, 1.45kg now. It is looking forward to how long he can grow.

Nabari city, is a small city at a high land, central Kii peninsula located center of the mainland.
This region was a part of the old Ninja Village. The Akame 48 waterfalls which are located in the mountain area of this city was the place where Ninja training. This mysterious spot is also home of the Japanese Giant Salamander.

Very small Child Japanese Giant Salamander (about 3cm long)

The Japanese giant salamander is endemic to Japan and protected as a special natural monument in 1951. The are easily hybridizes with Chinese giant salamanders, which were introduced to Japan.
To protect against genetic contamination, the separation program is running.
This museum is one of the places like that.

It’ not  Nessie. A salamander floating on the surface of the pool

You can enjoy the observation that salamanders that ascending to the water surface for breathing in the protected facility using an outdoor swimming pool.

Macro : Shiho’s seahorse ハナタツ

Hippocampus sindonis Jordan & Snyder, 1901

The Maracot Deep

Looking at the seahorse, I always remember a scene from the old science fiction novel “The Maracot Deep (1929)”. This novel is the work of Arthur Conan Doyle, famous for the adventures of Sherlock Holmes. The story is the adventure that marine scientists discover the sunken city Atlantis. I can’t forget is the scene where huge size seahorse eating eyeballs of huge halibut. What’s even scarier, the victim halibut have been sucked its eyeballs by the slender mouth of seahorse. So that I was a child age, it made scare my little heart. The seahorse of the photograph is a small size one called Shiho’s seahorse. This is about only 5 cm, tiny, cute, creature. However, if it would be over 10m….. I think stupid thinking. Lol. Owase, Mie, Japan. -20m

Oriental flying gurnard

Dactyloptena orientalis

Hi, this photo is not the same as I uploaded the previous time.
 The description of the photo is different.
 Thank you, Ron Silver.
 He taught me the correct name as below.
 “Based on geographic location, this is Dactyloptena orientalis (Dactylopterus volitans is an Atlantic/Caribbean species”
  This pic is taken at Owase, Mie, Japan.
 I re-upload the photo that corrects the name on the picture.
 Thank you.

Close-up : Longfin batfish ツバメウオ

Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775)

Shy and friendly

Tsubame-uo in Japanese

Longfin batfish are often seen from late summer to spring at the artificial reef point, called Gyosho point (The top is -18m. The bottom is -23m). They come from anywhere with a couple or three. And will go away to somewhere. At first, they are shy. When they look at divers, they hide behind the reef blocks. However, after a while, you will be able to shoot from nearby. It is a fun scene for them to swim behind divers looking for Longfin batfish. This picture was taken during a “safety stop”. If they feel like it, they will rise up with divers and see off. Owase, Mie, Japan. -5m